Saturday Spotlight: Kayla Farrish

In this blog we'll be spotlighting some of our students to celebrate their work and achievements, and learn a little more about the people behind this creative endeavor we call BKC.  This week meet Kayla Farrish!   A recent graduate of Digital Photo I, Kayla shares some of her thoughts on photography and getting inspired.  Read on:


How do you get inspired?

I'm really inspired by our human experiences. What makes us blush, how we feel when we're in love, what we do even in fear, our whim and magic, how we are burdened, what's in our webs of intimacy and onwards. Music, writing, dance, film, reading, and photography allows me to get closer to people, and to more unfolding questions. 


What's your daily routine - How do you approach shooting?

Both with some planning like screenwriting or choreographing because I have to borrow a camera from friends. I also improvise and love to shoot when I am inspired by some idea of image. I like to set up the camera and do self portraiture work with a timer- running back and forth. I also like to set up my space and lighting creatively with what's in the room. I love shallow depth of field, the mystery of -2 exposure, a bit of blur sometimes, motion, and mood and emotion.


What do you look for when you shoot?

I look for how I see a person. I look for feeling, movement, light, and honesty.


Do you work in the creative industries? If so, how do you find balance between work demands and your personal creative pursuits?

I grew up dancing and am now a freelance professional dancer. My personal creative pursuits luckily intertwine. I've always choreographed growing up, and I discovered a strong interest in studying photography in college and also developed an interest in film from performing in numerous dance films post-school. The past 2-3 years I have kept journals of my new choreographic ideas. I find that they all mostly unfold within imagery and through cinematic quality of film (video). I have absolutely loved adding photography and film as mediums to dance. Dance can be more interpretive or a bit more internal and the lens of a camera can help translate the feeling, meaning, and story. The camera creates intimacy in my work. My choreographic projects this year have included dance, film, and also photo series with writings in between.

I balance the work demands of teaching Pilates whenever I can, and also continuing to freelance. 
 

How did you become interested in photography? Has that interest changed or grown over time?

Photography became the first art form I admired from afar as a viewer. I took a course in college that I thought would be an introduction to photography in techniques and learning how to use a camera. However, it was actually a course of the themes, concepts, and history of photography instead. I loved it! We looked at various genres- original family portrait, landscape, street, erotic, voyeurism, portrait and so on. We evaluated meanings through discussion and essays. I was hooked on photography since. I'm happy I got to get a hold of the camera through my Photography 1 course at BKC.


What did you most enjoy from the course[s] at BKC?

I loved how incredibly helpful this course was for any one interested in using a camera. The technical information and methods for using a camera were all clear, broken down, and even personal in describing the functions of each camera for each person. I was excited and amazed to learn how to use this tool with my own creativity and perspective. It was inspiring to see the work of others and also have a teacher encourage you and gives you new ideas or ways to explore your voice farther!

I feel like I got the start I needed to begin making my film work and various photography series. 
 

Any other comments, ideas, remarks?

The camera is so cool because you get to project what you imagine or what you see into an image! A product! 

I loved and am thankful I got to take this course at BKC. I love portraiture and self portrait work so much!

 

Follow Kayla on Instagram @decentstructures_arts and @fulloutfarrish

Sign up (and save $50) for the next Digital Photo I starting this Monday

Student Spotlight: Meredith Moore

Meet Meredith.

In this new blog feature, we'll be introducing an emerging photographer and BKC student, show her or his work and talk shop about photography and creative life goals. Check out our interview with Meredith Moore and see some of her recent work below:

Follow Meredith on Instagram: @theselfiespy

 

 

 

What class or classes have you taken at BKC?

Digital Photo IDigital Photo IIUrban Landscapes


What are you most interested in photographing? Favorite subject?

I enjoy photographing people taking selfies. I know, its weird, but it is an on going project for me and there is never a shortage of subject matter! I also enjoy quiet industrial places, especially when there is warm low angle light. I also enjoy photographing garbage, especially around my studio in Gowanus, again I know its weird but there is never a shortage of subject matter!  

 

MEREDITH MOORE

Describe one of your favorite photos you've taken. What made it successful?

My biggest influence as a photographer is the painter Edward Hopper and the favorite photographs I take are the ones that remind me of his paintings. 

 

What motivates you to practice photography?

The creative practice. Getting outside and seeing what photos the world has to offer me that day. 


 

Do you have any areas of the city you love to photograph? Where?

Gowanus, I love the industrial beauty of it. I also enjoy taking photos of people taking selfies at the Whitney Museum or Metropolitan Art Museum. I like having the incredible works of art around me and seeing how people interact with them. 

 

MEREDITH MOORE

What advice would you give to those just beginning to make photos?

Don't worry about taking "good" or "bad" photos when you are out on a shoot. The more you remove judgement from the process the more you are going to see beautiful things to photograph around you. Take a lot of photos, experiment and don't be afraid to fail. Leave the judgement for the editing room. 


What are the most important technical lessons you've learned?

Balancing ISO, Exposure and Aperture  and knowing when to adjust to get the right balance for the right type of photo. 


What do you think is the biggest obstacles to overcome when getting into photography?

Not taking enough photos and not having a control over the technical aspects of the camera. Also not knowing how to edit and what makes one photo better (or worse) than the other. 


What would you still like to learn about?

Flash and shooting in low light. How to approach people on the street more confidently to closely photograph them. 


SLIDESHOW (All photos by Meredith Moore)

Spotlight: Aurora Appel

Meet Aurora!

In this new blog feature, we'll be introducing an emerging photographer and BKC student, show her or his work and talk shop about photography and creative life goals. This week we'll be chatting with Aurora Appel, a marketing associate at Eris Exchange who has developed her eye and technical skills considerably since she first began taking classes with us.  Check out our interview with Aurora and see some of her recent work below:

Follow Aurora on Instagram: @auroraappel

What class or classes have you taken at BKC?

Digital Photo I, Digital Photo II, Crash Course for Portraits, Field Guide: The Studio, Crash Course for DSLR, Essential Portraiture.  Friday Classes: Color, Photographers You to Need to Know, Composition.

What are you most interested in photographing? Favorite subject?

I love photographing anything and everything; I don’t necessarily have a niche just yet.

  Photo by AURORA APPEL

Photo by AURORA APPEL

What motivates you to practice photography?

I started taking photographs on my DSLR about a year ago and have fallen in love with it as a hobby. I love learning about light and how it relates to photography (either outdoor, studio, lack of light/night photography) and how it is used to compose each image.

What advice would you give to those just beginning to make photos?

Carry your camera everywhere. The more you practice, the more comfortable you become with your settings and the quicker you can evaluate a “scene” and how to shoot it. I also think taking a course over a longer period of time and meeting weekly instead of taking a seminar (for a couple hours) is beneficial for beginners. It gives you the opportunity to continually come back to class and improve.

  Photo by AURORA APPEL

Photo by AURORA APPEL

What are the most important technical lessons you've learned?

Some of the most important technical aspects I have learned at BKC would be proper exposure settings (as a beginner) and how to properly light your subject and composing certain shots.

What do you think is the biggest obstacles to overcome when getting into photography?

Finding the time to take photos and the confidence to approach your subjects you are shooting.

What would you still like to learn about?

I would like to expand my knowledge about external flash and light metering.

 

SLIDESHOW

All photos by AURORA APPEL