[ FREE ] Lecture: MVR 2.1

Returning for its second year, MVR is a lecture event series focused on new forms of exchange between body and technology developed by Eyebeam’s Nancy Nowacek and David Sheinkopf, Director of Technology at Pioneer Works. With the decreasing size and cost of computer vision, digital components, and advances in virtual reality, we are faced with a renewed awareness of the impact of current digital practices on the physical body. MVR provides a platform for learning and discussions concerning these new interactions between body and information, device, and action. Past speakers have included Gene Kogan, Liat Berdugo, Amelia Winger, and Daniel Temkin. The first series explored an expansive breadth of topics that investigate Virtual Reality, interactive installation, techno-choreography, and displaced embodiment.

At:
Brooklyn Central BKC
33 Washington St.
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Presenters:
Tommy Martinez
Madeline Schwartzmann
Matt Romein

 

Tommy Martinez is a New York City based artist and technologist working in multichannel sound, video, sculpture, and live data feeds through code. His primary interests lie in developing interactive media technologies and understanding how they relate to artistic representation and the human experience in general. Martinez has performed and exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Shanghai Biennial 2012, Pioneer Works, Harvestworks, Microscope Gallery, Clocktower Radio and Planthouse Gallery. Martinez works and collaborates as a technical consultant on media art projects worldwide.

Madeline Schwartzman is a New York City writer, filmmaker, and architect whose work explores human narratives and the human sensorium through social art, book writing, curating, and experimental video making. Her book See Yourself Sensing (Black Dog Publishing, London, 2011) is a collection of futuristic proposals for the body and the senses. Her forthcoming book, titled See Yourself X (Black Dog Publishing, London, December 2016), looks at the future of the human head and its extension into space via technology, fashion, culture, and art.

Matt Romein is a Brooklyn based artist and performer working at the intersection of live performance, generative computer art, and multi-media installation. He is a recent graduate of Tisch School of the Art’s ITP, a graduate program focusing on experimental and artistic uses of technology. Romein continues to work at the program as a researcher in residence. His work explores the various ways in which the physical body can be augmented and distorted by technology.